Arsenal

Arsenal: Charles Watts unsure whether Gunners can meet Mykhaylo Mudryk asking price

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Journalist Charles Watts has admitted that he can’t see Arsenal meeting the required asking price to sign Mykhaylo Mudryk.

On Wednesday, The Athletic’s Adam Crafton reported that it will take €100m (£87.5m) to prise Mudryk away from Shakhtar Donetsk.

The 21-year-old has been the subject of interest from the Gunners, but with his stock continuing to rise, it could become increasingly difficult for the north London outfit to secure a deal.

Fabrizio Romano previously revealed that his current employers would accept £60-65m for the winger’s signature.

However, having been directly involved in 16 goals in as many appearances – including five in the Champions League this season – it appears he is in higher demand.

Speaking on his YouTube channel, Watts said: “The Shakhtar director of football, Darijo Srna, spoke to The Athletic about Mudryk and the interest in him, and there is plenty of it.

“He talked about Arsenal, Newcastle, PSG, Manchester City – clubs like that in for Mudryk, who’s clearly a talented player, so you know the best clubs in Europe are going to be looking at him. But he’s put a bit of a price tag on Mudryk.

“For me, I just can’t imagine Arsenal will go anywhere near this sort of price tag.”

TIF Thoughts on Watts’ comments…

Would you want Arsenal to break the bank for Mykhailo Mudryk?

Yes

Yes

No

No

Given Mikel Arteta’s current options out wide, the Gunners could be willing to part with a considerable sum, especially considering the club’s lofty position at present.

With a five-point lead at the top of the Premier League table already built, we feel the side will need bodies this winter in order to maintain it.

Dubbed the ‘Ukrainian Messi’, Mudryk is destined for a bright future, which is only enforced by the level of clubs currently tracking him – and Edu will no doubt be doing all he can to broker a deal. However, it remains to be seen whether Arsenal are willing to break their transfer record to do so, hence Watts’ doubts.

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